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3D Digital Virtual Dissection Table From Anatomage

March 19, 2013

SCU offers students an exciting new way to study human anatomy with the world’s leading 3D interactive virtual dissection table.

 
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SCU, the nation’s leading post-graduate college for Chiropractic, Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine, Ayurveda and Massage, has added the latest cutting-edge technology to its educational repertoire in the form of a new virtual dissection table from Anatomage, a Silicon Valley-based company specializing in 3D medical technology.


The Anatomage Table is the world’s first 3D interactive virtual dissection table that allows SCU students and Faculty to access high resolution anatomical information in a way previously impossible. The new technology, installed in the SCU Anatomy Lab, will supplement each student’s learning experience in an exciting new way. The Anatomage Table offers an unprecedented realistic visualization of 3D anatomy and interactivity, delivers accurate anatomic details, and is complementary tool for cadaver based dissection courses.


The Anatomage Table provides 1-to-1 life-size visualizations of 3D anatomy based on actual data. Users can virtually dissect skeletal tissues, muscles, and organs like never before. Bridging the gap between imaging and anatomy, it allows students to dynamically switch between volume renderings and traditional 2D radiographs.


“We’re very excited to announce the installation of the Anatomage Table and its tremendous benefits to our students,” says SCU President Dr. John Scaringe. “Only a handful of universities in North America have the Anatomage Table and we are the first and currently the only Chiropractic and Acupuncture program to offer this unique technology. It delivers the latest in high resolution body imaging and features a fully interactive multi-touch screen interface allowing users to perform detailed dissections, moving thru multiple layers of tissue, or by using a virtual scalpel. Students can also view the body in many different ways, as opaque hard tissue, or as an x-ray. Surface models showing specific organs or, skeletal, muscular, or other body systems can also be added to specific lessons to increase the understanding of structural relationships. This cutting edge technology will help raise our standards of clinical education to the next level.”


For more information or a personal demonstration please contact the SCU Admissions Department at 877.434.7757 or http://www.scuhs.edu/admissions.